Lecturer

My collection of online lectures
The Unknown Storyteller
This paper introduces an innovative application of the Calculus of Indications in George Spencer-Brown's 'Laws of Form' to the analysis of story structure. Proposing a
solution to a problem raised by H A Porter Abbott (The Cambridge Introduction to Narrative, 2010/2016, p. 21): 'What is necessary for the story of Cinderella to be the story of Cinderella? … is a question that can never be answered with precision.' The paper potentially shows not just what's necessary for the story of Cinderella to be the story of Cinderella, but what's necessary for any story to be identified as a particular kind of story.
The Unknown Storyteller
Saturday 28th October 2019
If you are interested in learning more about The Unknown Storyteller, and how it can change your approach to story, sign up for my online course available on Edurouter
Thoughts on the Connections between Story and Life
An exploration of the proposition that there is no distinction between story and life.
Thoughts on the Connections between Story and Life
Saturday 18th October 2015
Integration in the Liberal Arts
In this Lecture on the integrated and integrative qualities of the Liberal Arts, I look at the Liberal Arts in a non-linear way. In doing so, I explore the links between the word-based Trivium and the number-based Quadrivium in novel ways. I draw on the work of George Spencer-Brown to show innovations in logic that take the practice of logic back to the PreSocratics and demonstrate the universality of the Liberal Arts and the I Ching and how they relate on a fundamental level.

Integration in the Liberal Arts - RILKO Lecture
Friday 28 Feb 2020
TEDx talk: Rediscovering the meaning of words
How do words reflect meaning? How can a forgotten classification of words help us reconnect to that meaning - and to a meaningful existence? And what does a marimba have to do with it?
Rediscovering the meaning of words
Tuesday 3rd December 2013

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